IS THE BIG HOUSING CRUNCH MOSTLY FICTION?

IS THE BIG HOUSING CRUNCH MOSTLY FICTION?

In some parts of California, there is definitely a housing crunch: small supplies of homes for sale, prices that escalate even when population has apparently stabilized and high prices that exclude most Californians as buyers.

But a massive, multi-million-unit shortage? Maybe not. At least, so suggests a scathing springtime report from the non-partisan acting state auditor.

Marin Voice: Following audit, changes must be made to state housing needs allocation

Marin Voice: Following audit, changes must be made to state housing needs allocation

In the March report, auditors said “HCD does not ensure that its needs assessments are accurate and adequately supported.” That’s a big deal.

In other words, the housing department’s top-down mandates for the next eight-year housing element cycle are unreliable, likely invalid and should therefore be unenforceable. The foundation of the RHNA methodology is as unstable as building housing on sand.

Marin Voice: Following audit, changes must be made to state housing needs allocation

Editorial: Flawed, flaky data of housing assessment creates questions

A recent audit of the state’s new housing quotas raises serious questions about the accuracy of the equation state bureaucrats have used to dictate how many units counties and cities have to approve for construction.

The audit doesn’t question California’s need for housing. But it does raise questions regarding flaws found in the number of units mandated by the state quotas.

IS THE BIG HOUSING CRUNCH MOSTLY FICTION?

NIMBYs Getting a Bad Rap in California

Tom Elias
VC Star | Ventura County Star
Mon, March 14, 2022, 9:30 AM
Rarely has a major group of Californians suffered a less deserved rash of insults and attacks than the myriad homeowners often described as “NIMBYs” — an acronym for folks who may favor new developments, but “not in my backyard.”

IS THE BIG HOUSING CRUNCH MOSTLY FICTION?

DEMISE OF R-1 ZONING WILL LEAD TO NEW BLOCKBUSTING

CALIFORNIA FOCUS
BY THOMAS D. ELIAS

In some parts of California, there is definitely a housing crunch: small supplies of homes for sale, prices that escalate even when population has apparently stabilized and high prices that exclude most Californians as buyers.

But a massive, multi-million-unit shortage? Maybe not. At least, so suggests a scathing springtime report from the non-partisan acting state auditor.